EDvice Exchange is the Center for the Advancement of Teaching‘s blog. It serves instructors in the Temple community and other institutions of higher education. This resource provides effective, research-based teaching practices for your consideration.
Summer Course Design Blog Series
course design

You’ve written the learning goals for your course and are now ready to design learning assessments that align with your course goals, offer opportunities for formative feedback and are educative. Well-designed learning assessments will:

Summer Course Design Blog Series
course design

Take a close look at your syllabus. What do your learning goals (if you have them) say about what students are going to learn and achieve in your course? Often, our goals or course descriptions focus entirely on foundational knowledge and some application of that knowledge, but what about learning goals that go beyond facts, concepts, formulas, and theories?

Summer Course Design Series title card
course design

Imagine trying to plan a trip with limited knowledge of your destination. Maybe you know dates of your departure and return and that you will have some travel companions but not much else. You don’t know the weather at your destination, or even how you will get there? You don’t know how many travel companions you will have or anything about them. If you are like me, who likes to feel prepared before embarking on any adventure, this sounds like a nightmare situation.

course design

The first time I taught, I was a first-year graduate student assigned to teach a section of an upper-level multi-section Italian Cinema course. I had never taught before, and certainly didn’t feel that I possessed the expertise to teach upperclassmen about the subject. The faculty fed me notes from their lectures and handed me the syllabus I would need to follow. It was the usual syllabus with a list of policies, a schedule of topics—i.e. the list of films that we would discuss—and the dates of two midterms and the final exam.

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When I speak with faculty about the importance of creating community around teaching, I often reference a wonderful essay by Lee Shulman, professor emeritus at Stanford University and past president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

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