Teaching in Higher Education Certificate for the Creative Disciplines

A Certificate for Teachers and Professionals

 

If you are current or prospective faculty in creative disciplines such as art, music, theater, media arts, creative writing, dance, and related disciplines who are looking to enhance your teaching or advance your career, this graduate-level Teaching in Higher Education Certificate for the Creative Disciplines has been developed especially to help you:

  • become a more effective educator
  • improve your students’ learning and creative development
  • build your curriculum vitae
  • network with other educators
  • develop high-quality teaching materials for didactic and studio courses
  • incorporate technology to support student learning  

How do you get it?

Earn the nine-credit certificate by completing three courses:

  • Course 1: Teaching in Higher Education Seminar (EPSY 8985, 3 Credits)
  • Course 2: Innovation, Technology, and Teaching in Higher Education (EPSY 8960, 3 Credits)
  • Course 3: Teaching Effectively in the Creative Arts (ART 8986, 3 credits)
In the first two courses, you will join colleagues across all disciplines who are completing the original Teaching in Higher Education Certificate. Faculty in the Teaching in the Higher Education certificate for the Creative Disciplines will then focus on the specific needs of creative arts classrooms and studios in Course 3.

Who qualifies for it?

This certificate typically requires participants to possess a Master’s Degree or equivalent education, with occasional exception.

What people are saying about the certificate:

"What your Ph.D. Didn't Cover," Inside Higher Ed

What graduates said about the certificate:

“The course was incredibly practical and apropos to instructing. The deliverables tie directly to teaching.”

“I have already put items into practice with new course design and feel it will be a more learner-centered classroom.”

“The interaction with other faculty on a supportive level was most valuable.”

“After the first course, I felt extremely confident about taking the full-time leap into academia. Three months later, I obtained a position as an Assistant Professor."

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