21st Annual Faculty Conference on Teaching Excellence

January 11, 2023 - 8:15am to January 12, 2023 - 4:00pm
Howard Gittis Student Center, Temple University

Temple University's Center for the Advancement of Teaching (CAT) invites proposals for the 21st Annual Faculty Conference on Teaching Excellence, an in-person event

Our theme for this year’s faculty conference is Achieving Rigor Without the Mortis: Keeping High Standards While Rejuvenating Our Students, Ourselves, and Our Communities. The pandemic gave us a unique window into the lives of our students—the unprecedented challenges they faced, as well as the assets they brought to the learning environment. For some of us, seeing the “whole” student brought home the idea that the playing field is inequitable for student learning, and triggered a desire for increased flexibility and compassion. We re-examined our course goals, policies, structures, assessments, and learning activities to see where we could be more supportive. For others, the need to maintain structure and expectations was crucial in those unsettling times. The feeling was that not doing so would be an assault on the rigor of our courses. These two different philosophical and practical approaches became so heated that the term “rigor wars” was coined.

This year’s conference will give you the opportunity to take a deep dive into the notion of rigor and its relationship to not only student learning, but to the well-being of our students, ourselves, and our communities. We invite you to reflect on these questions in advance of the conference: What is your definition of rigor, and how does that play out in your course goals, assessments, and learning activities? What effect does your definition and practice of rigor have on student motivation, on your attitudes about your students, and on your own well-being? Can our courses be rigorous while at the same time meet the needs of as many learners as possible? In other words, can we have rigor without the mortis? 

We invite you to submit proposals to share your ideas, insights, research, and strategies so that we can all learn together, harness our collaborative efforts, and make commitments that move teaching in higher education towards a more just future.  

Please consider submitting a proposal for a breakout session, poster session, or lightning talk. All proposals will be blind-reviewed. Remember to anonymize your proposal by removing institutional or personal identification information (i.e. XX University instead of Temple University). Please note that presenters must register for the conference.

Deadline Extended! 

Proposal submissions are due on October 17, 2022.

Your proposal should be grounded in the research on teaching and learning, be applicable to a variety of disciplines, and be non-commercial. You will be invited to indicate which of the following areas your proposal most closely aligns with (you may choose up to 3): 

  • Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice in Education

  • Online or Blended Teaching and Learning 

  • Instructional/Curricular Design and Strategies

  • Research/Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

  • Technology in Teaching and Learning

  • Affective Factors in Learning

 

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

Interactive 45-minute breakout sessions should present creative and effective ways to engage students, deepen learning, harness emotion in the classroom, teach with technology, and maximize the benefits of different modalities of teaching in higher education. Proposals should be grounded in the research on teaching and learning, and should clearly describe in which ways you will be actively engaging participants in activities that allow them to reflect, discuss and practice session concepts.  

Your proposal must include:

  • Title (10 words maximum)

  • Abstract (50 words maximum)

  • Brief description and outline of session, including plan for actively engaging participants in the session (500 words maximum)

  • Citations/references

Breakout Sessions Will be Reviewed Using the Following Criteria:

  • The proposal clearly explains the teaching project, strategy, or innovation

  • The topic of the proposal is of interest to a faculty (teaching) audience

  • There is a clear plan for facilitating an interactive session

  • The proposal is grounded in the research on teaching and learning


To submit your proposal, please click on the link below, fill in your information, and upload your proposal as a Word Document. Please remember to anonymize your proposal by removing institutional or personal identification information (i.e. XX University instead of Temple University). You will receive notification via email concerning the acceptance of your breakout session to the conference by Novemeber 11th, 2022.

Submit a breakout session proposal (DUE October 3)

 

LIGHTNING TALKS 

Lightning Talks are 15 minute opportunities for faculty to learn about a teaching idea that you have implemented. The talk should be designed to provide a brief (no longer than 7 minutes) introduction and explanation of the idea followed by Q&A. The facilitator will give the same talk four times during the session, providing participants the opportunity to visit four different talks. Note that lightning talks take place in a small group presentation format at a round conference table. Presenters may bring a device if technology is needed.

 Your proposal must include:

  • Lightning Talk title (10 words maximum)

  • Abstract (25 words maximum)

  • Brief description of the lightning talk (100 words maximum)

  • Citations/references

Lightning Talks Will be Reviewed Using the Following Criteria:

  • The proposal clearly explains the teaching project, strategy, or innovation

  • The topic of the proposal is of interest to a faculty (teaching) audience

  • The teaching project, strategy, or innovation can be explained in 7 minutes

 

To submit your proposal, please click on the link below, fill in your information, and upload your proposal as a Word Document. You will receive notification via email concerning the acceptance of your lightning talk to the conference by November 11th, 2022.

Submit a lightning talk proposal (DUE October 3)

 

POSTER SESSION 

Posters should highlight creative and effective practices, projects, and/or scholarship related to teaching and learning within higher education. At least one of the authors of the poster must be present during the poster session at the conference to have discussions with participants about their work. If accepted, you will also provide us a pdf copy of the poster for upload to the conference website. 

Your proposal must include:

  • Title

  • Abstract (25 words maximum)

  • Description of your work to be highlighted by your poster (500 word maximum)

    • Proposals must be grounded in research, include scholarly references, and present evidence of the impact of the ideas presented

  • Citations/references 

Posters Will be Reviewed Using the Following Criteria:

  • The proposal clearly explains the teaching project, strategy, or innovation

  • The topic of the proposal is of interest to a faculty (teaching) audience

  • The proposal includes scholarship to ground the project and includes evidence to support implications and conclusions or to demonstrate impact on learning. It includes appropriate citations.

 

To submit your proposal, please click on the link below, fill in your information, and upload your proposal as a Word Document. Remember to anonymize your proposal by removing institutional or personal identification information (i.e. XX University instead of Temple University). You will receive notification via email concerning the acceptance of your poster to the conference by November 11th, 2022.

Submit a poster proposal (DUE October 3)

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We look forward to receiving your proposals! Thank you for your interest in the Center for the Advancement of Teaching’s Annual Faculty Conference on Teaching Excellence and for your contributions to the scholarship of teaching and learning.  

For questions about the call for proposals, please contact cat@temple.edu.

For questions about the conference, please contact Sara Vann at svann@temple.edu

 

Day 1- Keynote Speaker, Dr. Marcus Johnson

Dr. Marcus Johnson is a Professor of Educational Psychology and Educational Research in the School of Education at Virginia Tech. He joined the Virginia Tech faculty following his decade-plus tenure at the University of Cincinnati, where he was the proud recipient of the University’s Faculty Exemplary Service Award and inductee of the Academy of Fellows for Teaching & Learning. Identifying as a Developmental and Educational Psychologist, Dr. Johnson’s scholarship concerning “motivation in education,” has included investigations of traditional and nontraditional college students’ motivations, the use of motivational strategies that enhance cognitive engagement and learning, and the effect of policies and practices on both student and faculty motivation. Nationally, Dr. Johnson has served on the American Psychological Association’s Council of Representatives, is an Associate Editor for the journal Contemporary Educational Psychology, and has previously co-chaired the faculty mentoring program for the American Educational Research Association’s Division for Learning & Instruction. Dr. Johnson earned his PhD in Educational Psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and for over a decade he has enjoyed teaching various courses in higher education, from Human Development to Human Learning, and from Educational Assessment to Research Methods. Prior to his work in higher education, Dr. Johnson had taught high school science in diverse settings.

Day 2- Plenary Speaker, Dr. Derek Bruff

Dr. Derek Bruff is an educator and author. He directed the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching for more than a decade, where he helped faculty and other instructors develop foundational teaching skills and explore new ideas in teaching. Dr. Bruff is the author of Intentional Tech: Principles to Guide the Use of Educational Technology in College Teaching (West Virginia University Press, 2019) and Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments (Jossey-Bass, 2009). Dr. Bruff has a PhD in mathematics and has math courses at Vanderbilt and Harvard University.

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